2022 Sun Nov 6

Sunday Links for All Saints, Nov. 6, 2022

The River in the fall

Nov. 6, 11:00am – Holy Eucharist, All Saints

  • Holy Eucharist, Sun. Nov. 6 YouTube link Nov. 6
  • Lectionary for Nov. 6, 2022,
    All Saints
  • Bulletin for Nov. 6, 2022,
    Bulletin
  • Sermon for Oct. 30, 2022,
    Sermon
  • Coffee hour, Nov. 6, 2022, 12pm,
  • Morning Meditation , Mon, Nov. 7, 6:30am Zoom link Meeting ID: 879 8071 6417 Passcode: 790929
  • Ecumenical Bible Study, Wed., Nov. 9, 10am-12pm. Reading lectionary of Nov. 13
  • November, 2022 Newsletter
  • All articles for Nov. 6, 2022

  • All Saints, Year C

    I.Theme –  Celebrating the People of God 

     "Peaceable Kingdom" -Beerhorst (2011)

    The lectionary readings are here  or individually:

    Old Testament – Daniel 7:1-3,15-18
    Psalm – Psalm 149 BCP Page 807
    Epistle –Ephesians 1:11-23
    Gospel – Luke 6:20-31

    All Saint’s Days commemorates not only all the martyrs but all the people of God, living and dead, who form the mystical body of Christ

    From Daniel, all that is left is the notion that the events of human history, no matter how disturbing, are irrelevant to God, and to God’s holy ones, who will prevail in the end. 

    The saints have come to know God, not by their own efforts, but by the power of God in Christ. Those who have put their lives in Christ’s hands should trust the one whom God has made the head of all things for the church which is his body.  The Psalm emphasizes the praise response we should have. 

    The Gospel reminds us that the Christian hope is not in this world or in the things of this world. In fact, it is not even in the apocalyptic reversal of fortunes, as much as that is a part of the Gospel of Luke, and may be a part of the hope of believers. Rather it is in the Father’s mercy toward us, in the Son’s surrender to death, in the power of the Spirit in our lives leading us to act as God’s children that our hope lies.
    Read more about the lectionary

    All Saints Day

    All Saints Sunday

     

    In our Baptismal Covenant we, along with traditional Christians around the globe, profess in the ancient Baptismal Creed the words: “I believe in… the communion of saints, … the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting.” (Book of Common Prayer, page 304)

    From its very beginning, the Church understood the Body of Christ to encompass all baptized persons, both the living and the dead. Christ’s kingdom transcends time and space; and not even death can sever the relationship that the faithful have in Christ.

    All are united in a mystical communion with Christ by virtue of baptism (1 Corinthians 6:11). The term saint was used by Paul to designate all baptized Christians (Romans 1:7; 2 Corinthians 1:1; Ephesians 1:1), even the unruly ones (1 Corinthians 1:2)!

    In the New Testament, all those who believe and were baptized were referred to as saints. The word saint originally meant "holy".

    On All Saints Day, we make celebrate this idea in the here and now by recognizing and celebrating our relationship, not only with those around us today, but also with all those who have gone before us in all times and place. They are connected in one communion. 

    All Saints is also a time for welcoming new members. Traditionally baptisms are held in the Episcopal Church at the Feast of the Baptism of our Lord,  Easter, Pentecost,  and All Saints. 

    Read more about All Saints

    All Saints Sunday – A Time of Baptism

    • McKenna Long – Jan. 2, 2011
    • Alexander Long VI – Nov. 4, 2012
    • Owen Long – Aug. 4, 2013

    Baptism of Scarlett Joy Long is on Nov. 1, 2015.  Congratulations! Baptism is one of the sacraments of the Episcopal Church and is one of the times of the year appointed for baptism.

    Here are the 3 Whys of Baptism

    Veterans’s Day, Nov. 11

    “Let Us Beat Swords into
    Plowshares”                                     “Tragedy of War”-Michael LaPalme

    Veterans’ Day, November 11  

    At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, World War I (called the Great War) ends.

    On November 11, 2018 at the beginning of the worship service, we along with many Americans will toll bells in remembrance of those who served and sacrificed.

    From a Litany for Veterans by Robb McCoy-“God of love, peace and justice, it is your will for the world that we may live together in peace. You have promised through the prophet Isaiah that one day the swords will be beaten into plow shares. Yet we live in a broken world, and there are times that war seems inevitable. Let us recognize with humility and sadness the tragic loss of life that comes in war. Even so, as we gather here free from persecution, we may give thanks for those that have served with courage and honor. ”  Here is an English Veterans’ Service.

    All gave some, Some gave all.


    While the US has “Veterans’ Day” celebrating and honoring all veterans who have served, Europe and Canada has “Remembrance Day” about the end of World War I  on November 11, 1918.  The red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day due to the poem “In Flanders Fields”. These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I; their brilliant red color became a symbol for the blood spilled in the war.

    Mark Knopfler wrote “Remembrance Day” about this day. The song and  illustrated slideshow are here .

    From “Remembrance Day”

    “Time has slipped away
    The Summer sky to Autumn yields
    A haze of smoke across the fields
    Let’s sup and fight another round
    And walk the stubbled ground

    “When November brings
    The poppies on Remembrance Day
    When the vicar comes to say
    May God bless everyone
    Lest we forget our sons

    “We will remember them
    Remember them
    Remember them”

    How do we get halloween (Oct. 31) from All Saints (Nov. 1) and All Souls(Nov.2) days ?

    The word Halloween is a contracted form for All Hallows’ (holy persons or saints) Evening- the day before All Saints.

    Halloween has been on Oct 31 because of the Celtic traditions.   Halloween also not only focused on death but on the  concept of death blending in the supernatural.    The Church scheduled All Saints and All Souls after Halloween.   The emphasis on All Soul’s  focused on those who had died only and did not dwell on stories surrounding death.

    What is the Halloween connection ?

    Halloween originated in Celtic cultures and  spread to Christian.

    The word Halloween is a contracted form for All Hallows’ (holy persons or saints) Evening- the day before All Saints.  

    Halloween has been on Oct 31 because of the Celtic traditions.   Halloween also focused on death but on the  concept of death blending in the supernatural.    The Church scheduled All Saints and All Souls after Halloween.   The emphasis on All Soul’s  focused on those who had died only and did not dwell on stories surrounding death.

    All Soul’s did  satisfy many Catholics’ interest in death and the supernatural. But the unchristian idea of wandering spirits persisted in some areas. Conceding that they could not completely get rid of the supernatural elements of the celebrations, the Catholic Church began characterizing the spirits as evil forces associated with the devil. 

    Celtic Tradition

    Nov. 1 marked Samhain, the beginning of the Celtic winter. (The Celts lived as early as 2,000 years ago in England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland and northern France.) Samhain, for whom the feast was named, was the Celtic lord of death, and his name literally meant "summer’s end." Since winter is the season of cold, darkness and death, the Celts soon made the connection with human death.

    The eve of Samhain, Oct. 31, was a time of Celtic pagan sacrifice, and Samhain allowed the souls of the dead to return to their earthly homes that evening. Ghosts, witches, goblins and elves came to harm the people, particularly those who had inflicted harm on them in this life. Cats, too, were considered sacred because they had once been human beings who had been changed as a punishment for their evil deeds on this earth

    The Roman conquest of England brought two other festivals commemorating the dead

    Read more…

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